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Workplace Generations infographic – which one are you?!

Sometimes, we stumble across an infographic or piece of research that really stands out for us.  This Generations in the Workplace infographic by UXC Professional Solutions is a great example of something that grabbed our attention.  And it wasn’t for reasons of vanity or a middle-aged crisis!  😀

The remarkable difference across workplace generations presents a very real challenge, and opportunity, for team dynamics, leadership and HR.  It also helps provide another layer of insight and clarity into our post about the paradoxical situation for modern day marketers whereby they need to be part scientist and part artist.  Check out the infographic at the bottom of the post – you can use the embed code too, of course.  🙂

Generations in Workplace IG post

Workplace generations

It actually highlights a fascinating evolution of the workplace – from Baby Boomers born before 1963, to Gen X (those born between 1963-1980), and to the Millennials, who were born between 1980-1995.

The infographic was built based on a survey of 1,200 workers across these different generation, which measured and assessed their strengths and weaknesses.  In other words, what they bring to the working environment, how they differ, and what their pros and cons are.

Baby Boomers

Baby BoomerOn the one hand, those born before 1963 willingly put in hard graft and hours ‘as part of the job’ without complaining, put the team ahead of themselves, and help others.

On the other hand, Baby Boomers are more stuck in their ways, which can lead to potential issues when it comes to collaboration with those outside their team or department.  They’re a bit stuck in their ways!

Gen X

Gen XInterestingly, those born between 1963 and 1980 are driven, look for solutions by being flexible, and have a keen focus on generating revenue.

However, Gen X are also typified by being more of a cost overhead for their employers, and also suffer from a lack of gravitas at senior levels.

Millennials

MillennialThe latest generation to be pursuing a career, those born between 1980 and 1995, is one typified by being willing to take more risks, grab opportunities as they come along, and have entrepreneurial flair.

The downside to Millennials is that they do not work hard, are selfish, and unproductive.

Generations in the Workplace infographic

Generations in the Workplace IG

[Click image to enlarge.]

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What do you think about these findings?  Is it indicative of your colleagues and workplace dynamics?  Personally, I’m pleased to be caricatured as Gen X!

Dan Purvis
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Dan Purvis

Founder & Director at Communications Axis

Dan Purvis is Founder & Director at Comms Axis, a fast-growth, full-service marketing agency specialising in content marketing, social media and digital marketing for businesses of all sizes.


Ranked by Brand Republic as one of the Top 50 UK Marketing and Social Media influencers, Dan Purvis is passionate about the philosophy behind Comms Axis: we bring content, marketing and sales together to connect businesses with their audiences.


We pride ourselves on delivering tangible business value and ROI alongside excellent customer service. We work with a broad range of clients and industries, from B2B to B2C, from technology to cosmetics, from start-ups / SoHos to pan-European and global brands.

Dan Purvis
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13 Comments

  1. Ishi Says:

    The infographic is trending so much in these time, and I like they way you represent workplace generations with images and information.

  2. B^nnon Says:

    Nice layout for the article and graphic. I think the results of the study are a bit subjective. While I am close to being a baby boomer and still on the edge of Gen X… I am very willing to listen and in constant search of improving my skillset. I think my experience in invaluable and yes, I work very hard but that is mostly because I own my own business 🙂

    • B^nnon Says:

      wow.. spell check much? [edits] *is invaluable

      monday… arggg :/

    • Dan Purvis Says:

      Thanks – credit to UXC for the infographic of course, and stats and research can be spun to tell a variety of talkes 😉

    • This is probably because you were born on the cusp, as was I. I am a 1962 baby. I have the work ethic of my parents, I work hard, I am a team player, etc…. but I am also very flexible and look for new and innovative ideas and love bringing young people on board for fresh outlooks and ways to do things. I also own my own business. You won’t grow if you aren’t willing to think outside your comfort zone.

      • Dan Purvis Says:

        And not just thinking outside of it, but actually “doing” outside your comfort zone! Thanks for the comment, Dawn!

  3. Cher Merrill Says:

    This is an interesting article, but I am puzzled by some of the findings, which made me wonder if the 1200 participants were assessing their own skills and attitudes, or asked for responses regarding their opinions regarding all age groups (ex.: “Do you consider yourself to (a) like change (b) neutral to change (c) dislike change?” vs. “Do you think Baby Boomers (a) like change (b) are neutral to change (c) dislike change?”) I think asking for opinions regarding workers other than oneself would make the sampling subject to stereotypes.
    Twitter:

    • Dan Purvis Says:

      Yes – totally agree…to be honest, we could all probably see bits of all three stereotypes in each of us! Stereotyping is never ideal, but I see this as more a case of tongue-in-cheek humour that scientific research.

  4. Cher Merrill Says:

    This is an interesting article, but I am puzzled by some of the findings, which made me wonder if the 1200 participants were assessing their own skills and attitudes, or asked for responses regarding their opinions regarding all age groups (ex.: “Do you consider yourself to (a) like change (b) neutral to change (c) dislike change?” vs. “Do you think Baby Boomers (a) like change (b) are neutral to change (c) dislike change?”) I think asking for opinions regarding workers other than oneself would make the sampling subject to stereotypes.
    Twitter:

  5. E S Says:

    Why has Gen Y been eliminated? Circa 2008-2011, especially so much literature spoke to the Gen X Gen Y in the workforce differences and challenges. Millenials in the workforce were up and coming and were deemed those born late 90s forward.

    • Dan Purvis Says:

      Great Q – I think this infographic provides an indication of workforce trends across demographics…as such, it has some more generalised aspects that are interesting and valid, but I wouldn’t take this as the holy grail of workforce typologies.
      Thanks for the comment!
      Dan

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